Thursday, June 04, 2015

11 Killer Tips to Stop Saying UM Forever


Practical tips to minimize your use of "UM" and other filler words in your presentations and conversations - courtesy of London Speaker Bureau


Presentation Tips on Twitter Presentation Skills Club on Facebook Executive Speech Coach, Business presentation tips from George Torok, the Speech Coach for Executives Share/Save/Bookmark

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Open your presentation with Pizzazz

Opening your your presentation ebook on Amazon
Open Your Presentation With Pizzazz
 


Why is the opening so important?

When you speak to an audience you have seconds to make a good first impression. That first impression must persuade them to listen and believe you. Get it wrong and you lose. You might have an important and valuable presentation prepared but if they’re turned off and tuned out at the beginning, everything you’ve prepared was wasted.

The opening to your presentation is critical to your success. You shouldn’t be surprised that poor speakers have poor openings. When you speak, you can recover from many mistakes during your presentations – but a weak opening isn’t one of them.


Questions that this book will answer for you

What can you say and do to grab the attention of your audience, build rapport and convince them to believe you?

How can you write a powerful opening faster?

How can you create one of the most engaging openings – a story?

What common mistakes should you avoid?

What is the three-part ADR formula that helps you focus your opening?

What are the five keys that foretell a successful opening?

What are the non-verbal actions you need to employ before you speak?

What magic words and phrases can you use to have them with your first words?


Follow the guidelines, use the tips, examine the examples and play with the templates offered to write, prepare and deliver your opening with pizzazz.


Who is The Author?

George Torok was a shy and introverted student who learned how to present. He wasn’t a natural. That’s why he simplifies and explains clearly how to become a better speaker.

As The Speech Coach for Executives he coaches executives, entrepreneurs and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations.

Through his training program, Superior Presentations, his company trains managers, professionals and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations… because inferior never wins.

George Torok has delivered over 1,500 professional presentations. He has coached and worked with hundreds of executives. He has written over 500 articles and 2,000 blog posts. As the host of the weekly radio show, Business In Motion, he interviewed over 600 entrepreneurs, executives and experts.


 Read this ebook now on your Kindle



Presentation Tips on Twitter Presentation Skills Club on Facebook Executive Speech Coach, Business presentation tips from George Torok, the Speech Coach for Executives Share/Save/Bookmark

Thursday, May 07, 2015

Venus Explains the Atom in terms the kid can understand

Enjoy this video clip from WKRP in Cincinnati. Powerful example of explaining a complex subject in simple terms. Talk in a way that your listener understands. Use their perspective.




Presentation Tips on Twitter Presentation Skills Club on Facebook Executive Speech Coach, Business presentation tips from George Torok, the Speech Coach for Executives Share/Save/Bookmark

Tuesday, April 07, 2015

Steven Pinker at TED - a poor presentation...

Steven Pinker - pretty much reads his notes from his book "The Stuff of Thought"

I enjoyed reading his book and recognized most of his talk from his book. Unfortunately I found his presentation difficult to follow because his key message wasn't clear. What was his point? He clearly read his presentation which means he wasn't talking with his audience. He was simply reading notes from his book to them - as if they were children.

Many insightful authors and writers are lousy presentations because writing and speaking are different skills sets.

In my option this was a good example of a a terrible presentation.

However, I would read his next book.

Presentation Tips on Twitter Presentation Skills Club on Facebook Executive Speech Coach, Business presentation tips from George Torok, the Speech Coach for Executives Share/Save/Bookmark

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

David Christian at TED - well delivered talk - with passion, imagery and purpose.
Finishes with an emotional close.


Presentation Tips on Twitter Presentation Skills Club on Facebook Executive Speech Coach, Business presentation tips from George Torok, the Speech Coach for Executives Share/Save/Bookmark

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Build Rapport Rapidly

Build rapport when speaking

If you want to persuade people you first need to establish rapport. The sooner you build rapport with your audience, the sooner they will listen to your ideas. The stronger the rapport, the more they will like and trust you.

What is Rapport?

You have rapport with a person when you both see things the same way, which means they believe that you understand them and see things their way.

If you want to persuade them to see things your way, you must first demonstrate that you see things from their position. Then you might be able to shift their perspective.

How can you build rapport rapidly?

Recognize their Perspective


Point out the challenges and frustrations that they face. You might need to do some research to better understand your audience. The fastest way to connect with your audience is to acknowledge their pain. Everyone wants appreciation of their hardships.

Are they sales people who face cold calling, rising quotas and longer sales cycles? Are they professionals striving for more respect from other colleagues? Are they IT managers juggling impossible demands from customer service and operations?

After you have acknowledged their pain, they might accept that you are in their camp. The next thing to do is to remind them of their strengths, valuable contributions and importance to their organizations. Shift the outlook from negative to positive.

These things will establish a growing rapport with your audience. You’ll notice heads nodding in agreement and a keener interest in your message.

Relate Common Experience

Relate an example about how you endured a similar situation. This goes beyond understanding. There is nothing like common experience (especially pain) to bring people together. This principle is captured in the old expression, “The enemy of my enemy is my friend.”

Unmask the Elephant in the Room

State the obvious truth that everyone knows but avoids saying out loud. Similarly, you might ask the unasked questions that prey on everyone’s mind. By giving voice to their repressed thoughts and feelings you become accepted as their friend and perceived as a leader.
Build rapport with your audience by recognizing the view from their perspective to show that you are with them. Then they will be more willing to listen to you and accept your message.


Presentation Tips on Twitter Presentation Skills Club on Facebook Executive Speech Coach, Business presentation tips from George Torok, the Speech Coach for Executives Share/Save/Bookmark

Friday, March 20, 2015

Danger of a Single Story - TED talk video - passionate speaker



Presentation Tips on Twitter Presentation Skills Club on Facebook Executive Speech Coach, Business presentation tips from George Torok, the Speech Coach for Executives Share/Save/Bookmark