Just Because it's on the Internet Doesn't Mean you can Steal it

Don’t violate copyrights in your presentations — Gihan Perera

Playing YouTube videos during your presentations is completely against YouTube’s terms of use. We should *assume* intellectual property is protected, unless the owner explicitly says otherwise. Unfortunately, I’ve found that many speakers take the opposite approach, and assume it’s permissible to copy material until somebody points out they are violating somebody else’s intellectual property rights. I’ve seen plenty of examples of people embedding YouTube into PowerPoint, pl aying TED.com videos in a paid presentation, inserting Dilbert cartoons into their handouts, etc. — all of which are violations of the owners’ terms of use.



Executive Speech Coach, Business presentation tips from George Torok, the Speech Coach for Executives.Share/Save/Bookmark

2 comments:

Gihan Perera said...

George, you seem to have copied this from a newsletter I wrote to. However, due to very poor editing on the part of the newsletter's editors, they significantly changed the meaning of what I originally wrote.

In particular, I did NOT say: "Playing YouTube videos during your presentations is completely against YouTube’s terms of use."

The correct version is available here on my blog.

Gihan

George Torok said...

Gihan,

Thanks for your correction. I thought that I had emailed you when I used this. My mistake. Thanks for your forgiveness.